Turkey Time

We are in the heat of Spring Turkey season in Iowa.  As usual, we have been greeted with warm and cold, dry and wet, and windy and calm conditions in the first week of season.  Here are a couple things to think about that might help overcome variable conditions and maximize your opportunity for success.

1: Scout

turky-roostTurkey, like most game, are creatures of habit.  They roost, travel, feed, and congregate in the same general areas.  During the Spring, if you know where they roost and where they strut, you should be able to put yourself in position to get a good shot.

 

 

 

2: Be Heard

slate callThe best way to gauge a gobbler’s interest in your location is to get them to gobble at your call.  We often hear gobbles after calling and assume/hope that they are responding to us.  In many cases, they are not.  Strong winds, distance, and terrain can effect the Turkey’s hearing.  Set yourself up to be heard.

 

 

 

 

 

3: Be Visible

visible turkeyOn days when wind makes it tough to be heard, it is important to make your decoys visible.  A major part of the courtship process relies heavily on sight.  A dominant Tom without a hen is likely to be very vulnerable to highly visible decoys.  To each their own, but I prefer a Jake/Hen combo.

 

 

 

4: Be Invisible

IMG_1111 (1)Concealment is key.  You can scout, find the best spot, make the most accurate calls and get a gobbler to see your decoy, but if you move at the wrong time, it’s game over.  I prefer to use a blind, especially now that I’m hunting more with my young children.  Blind or not, you must disappear in your surroundings if you want to kill a long beard.

 

 

Turkey hunting is one of the gems of Spring in Iowa.  The sound of a distant gobble and the sight of a strutting Tom are as infectious to some as whistling wings and rutting bucks are to others.  Unfortunately, Iowa’s Springs typically have significant weather swings that can make it challenging to be successful in the field.  Don’t let wind and rain slow you down.  Do your homework.  Know the area you are going to hunt, and put yourself in position to succeed.